TUMBLR

Followers

Follow on Bloglovin

Wednesday, July 17, 2019

The Lion of Lucerne

Curled in his den above a pond, impaled by a spear, is a dying lion – a haunting monument to the Swiss soldiers who were killed protecting the French king during the French Revolution.

More than 700 Swiss soldiers were massacred defending King Louis and Marie Antoinette in an attack on the Tuileries in 1792.

The dying lion is allegorical of  the soldiers’ courage, strength, and willingness to die rather than to betray their oath of service.  Mark Twain described it as “the most moving piece of stone in the world.”


The Lion lies in his lair in the perpendicular face of a low cliff  for he is carved from the living rock of the cliff. His size is colossal, his attitude is noble. His head is bowed, the broken spear is sticking in his shoulder, his protecting paw rests upon the lilies of France. Vines hang down the cliff and wave in the wind, and a clear stream trickles from above and empties into a pond at the base, and in the smooth surface of the pond the lion is mirrored, among the water-lilies.

Around about are green trees and grass. The place is a sheltered, reposeful woodland nook, remote from noise and stir and confusion  – and all this is fitting, for lions do die in such places, and not on granite pedestals in public squares fenced with fancy iron railings. The Lion of Lucerne would be impressive anywhere, but nowhere so impressive as where he is.

— Mark Twain, A Tramp Abroad, 1880

Above the mournful lion is the Latin inscription, “HELVETIORUM FIDEI AC VIRTUTI,” which means “To the loyalty and bravery of the Swiss,” and below the lion’s niche is a list of the names of the fallen officers and the approximate numbers of soldiers who died (DCCLX = 760), and survived (CCCL = 350).

The tragedy was that their noble sacrifice was in vain.

On that fateful day, a contingent of 900 Swiss Guard mercenaries guarding King Louis XVI at the Tuileries Palace in Paris found themselves surrounded by an angry mob of some 30,000 French Revolutionaries. The mob demanded that the mercenaries step aside; the mercenaries refused. More than 700 of the Guard lost their lives in the battle that ensued, willing to die for the man they had been hired to protect, King Louis XVI.

No one bothered to tell the Swiss Guard that they were guarding an empty palace; the king and his family had already snuck out and fled.

THE LION INSIDE A PIG

Although thousands of visitors throng the monument daily, few realize that there are not one, but two different animals carved on the sandstone.

Here's how the story goes ...

The initiative to create a commemorative sculpture was taken by Karl Pfyffer von Altishofen, an officer of the Swiss Guard who was on leave in Lucerne during the August 10th massacre. He put up a public appeal for funds and commissioned  Danish sculptor Bertel Thorvaldsen to design the monument.
Although many contributed, the money collected was not enough to pay Thorvaldsen. The liberals, in particular, disapproved of the monument  The lack of funds did not discourage Pfyffer, who somehow managed to persuade Thorvaldsen for the job. According to the Thorvaldsens Museum Archives,
Pfyffer deliberately hid the truth from Thorvaldsen until the delivery of the model of the sculpture was secured. Upon discovering that he was shortchanged, the irate Thorvaldsen decided to get even by adding some last minute changes to his design. The artist didn’t alter the sculpture itself, out of respect for the fallen soldiers. Instead, he changed the shape of the alcove where the lion lay to resemble the outline of a pig!

Can you see the pig?

Musings Of A Tired Mummy

34 comments:

  1. Isn't that absolutely amazing?! It's just so beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
  2. What a tribute to all those that died. Beautiful.

    Have a fabulous day. ♥

    ReplyDelete
  3. I saw the pig after I went back and looked several times. Fascinating story. I bet it was so impressive to see in person too! I can't imagine designing and creating something this magnificent looking!

    betty

    ReplyDelete
  4. I am currently reading a book on the French revolution it was pretty brutal. But push people past the limits and create a financially unstable world and that is what happens the west should be ware...


    Allie of
    www.allienyc.com

    ReplyDelete
  5. Mark Twain described it as “the most moving piece of stone in the world.”....I agree!

    ReplyDelete
  6. I see the pig! I didn't at first but I looked again and there it was.

    ReplyDelete
  7. That's such a lovely tribute - and fab photos!

    ReplyDelete
  8. I didn't see the pig until you mentioned it.. such a great informative post!

    ReplyDelete
  9. That is a beautiful tribute the detail of it is amaing :-)

    Have a roaringtastic week :-)

    ReplyDelete
  10. I can see the pig - great story about the origin on the sculpture.

    ReplyDelete
  11. What a sad and compelling story! I had heard of The Lion of Lucerne before, but never heard the story behind the sculpture.

    ReplyDelete
  12. SO neat! The lion is absolutely beautiful. And how funny about the pig!

    With Love,
    Mandy

    ReplyDelete
  13. That's a wonderful tribute to the Swiss soldiers. I had no idea this had happened.

    ReplyDelete
  14. The story gave me goosebumps as does the lion. Thank you so much for sharing and have a nice day my friend! Hugs

    ReplyDelete
  15. Oh my gosh, yes YES I see the pig now! What a sad story and the carvings in the mountain. Thanks so much for sharing. HI GIRLFRIEND, Did ya miss me? Yep, I'm back now... do stop by if you get a chance. HUGS

    ReplyDelete
  16. What an amazing story especially the ending with the alcove being shaped as a pig! #AnythingGoes

    ReplyDelete
  17. What a fantastic memorial! It's so moving just to see it in a photo; I'm sure it's even better in person.
    In your first shot, I noticed that the outline was not symmetrical and now I know why. Thanks so much for sharing.

    I'm so glad you linked up at 'My Corner of the World' this week!

    My Corner of the World

    ReplyDelete
  18. Fantastic & realistic statue - sad though.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I'd love to be there to see that in person. A beautiful sight.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Before I read the post I sang in my head The Lion King song, "In the jungle the mighty jungle the lion sleeps tonight..." I didn't realize it was passing away. How sad, but what a beautiful tribute.

    ReplyDelete
  21. I do see the pig! I just forgot to add that to my previous comment. A double take, for sure!

    ReplyDelete
  22. Thank you for joining the Wordless Wednesday Blog Hop.

    Have a fabulous Wordless Wednesday. ♥

    ReplyDelete
  23. What a fascinating post ... great story, well told #BloggerClubUK

    ReplyDelete
  24. I saw the lion when I visited Lucerne years ago and it is incredibly moving. I didn't know the part of the story about the pig - very interesting.

    ReplyDelete
  25. What a wonderful sculpture! And a fascinating story.

    ReplyDelete
  26. I had never heard of this before, it is absolutely stunning! I love that he added a pig as a protest to being hired for work that they couldn't pay him for. #GlobalBlogging

    ReplyDelete
  27. The beautiful details of old buildings such as these really makes our modern towers look drab to me.

    ReplyDelete
  28. What an amazing image! I love your travel posts. Thanks for sharing on Sunday's Best.

    ReplyDelete
  29. Now I miss Lucerne and Switzerland. Such a great story indeed..

    ReplyDelete
  30. Dearest Veronica,
    That is indeed rather moving, to see the face of the dying lion and what the carving embodies. Such tragedy and indeed, inside a pig... great symbolic.
    Hugs,
    Mariette

    ReplyDelete
  31. oh wow, that's an amazing story and the lion inside the pig ...so moving and then the thought that they were guarding an area that had been left vacant. So so so sad.

    ReplyDelete
  32. Wow, what a beautiful, haunting sculpture. (And no, I don't see the pig.)

    ReplyDelete