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Tuesday, October 19, 2021

Kapok

I was at the park in my neck of the woods when I spotted patches of white fluff on the grass.

At first, I thought these were the sheddings of some white dog.

On closer inspection, I noticed a couple of weird red bugs on them. 

One even had a 'face' on its back!

A jogger at the park pointed to the tree above us and explained that the white fluff came from seed pods dangling from the tree.


I googled and look what I found!
Turned out, that huge tree was a kapok tree (Ceiba pentandra).


Fluffy fiber from the seed pod

Kapok is used as stuffing for pillows, mattresses, and upholstery, as insulation material, and as a substitute for absorbent cotton in surgery.

And the Hitler bug was actually a red cotton stainer.


My Corner of the World

65 comments:

  1. Nature is amazing! Have a nice week, Veronica!

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  2. My gosh! Never heard of a Kapok tree. I have learned so many things while blogging and thank you for sharing. Interesting post.
    Betsy

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  3. Dearest Veronica,
    Hah, fond memories for me. Not about the stink bug but the kapok tree!
    In East Java where we also worked a lot, there were lots of kapok trees.
    Also in Mexico we had kapok trees. One of the hotels we stayed at had a huge monumental Ceiba tree. We even have one here in Florida, the State below us an we might have to visit it out of 'rindu'...
    Hugs,
    Mariette

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  4. A beautiful tree that I have never seen in Italy.
    I see that the red bugs have found a natural perfect habitat.
    Thanks for sharing the photos.

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  5. I've never seen those kind of bugs before. Beautiful colors.

    Have a fabulous day. ♥

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  6. Didn't know about kapok trees, nor these fascinating bugs. Gorgeous!
    Blessings!

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  7. WOW, those creepy bugs sure do like that white puff stuff!

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  8. Beautiful bugs, making the Kapok looking good.

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  9. Wow, what an incredible find. I'm not familiar with the tree or the bug. Thanks for sharing your wonderful find. I love you close-up of the bug.

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  10. Red bugs are really interesting and little scary:)

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  11. I love bugs and study and research bugs. I follow bugs and macro stuff on Instagram. Love the post and the bugs are really beautiful creatures. I like learning things when I come here. Great photos - that macro up cose wow.

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  12. How strange these bugs was, Veronica.
    Beautiful photos!

    Have a nice week!

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  13. There was a very popular and well-received children's book called The Great Kapok Tree when I first started working as a librarian. Hadn't thought of it or kapok in years. Interesting trees and bugs! Poor thing to have a face like Hitler, though. Might have to squash him.

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  14. Beautiful tree but strange about these bugs.

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  15. I've heard of Kapok trees but never have seen them in real life; only in children's books!

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  16. ...we have cottonwood trees that make the ground look like it's covered with snow.

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  17. I've not heard of this tree. Nature continues to surprise.
    Amalia
    xo

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  18. Ohhhh, help, you really published a pic of "him", LOL - I think as German I´d get "killed" (did you know it was a stupid person in MY town who gave him German citizenship?!)

    But fitting. That little, Austrian man was but a bug. Or... no, that´s mean on the bug!

    Brrrr... I would dash and run from such a tree, not braving up and taking pics!

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  19. Thanks for a fun and informative post, those bugs are a bit scary. I've never seen a Kapok tree before, although I have heard of kapok being used as stuffing. Have a great day, take care, hugs, Valerie

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  20. Interesting ! Bugs are necessary even if there are ugly ;)
    Have a nice day !
    Anna

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  21. Haha, a Hitler bug, people have ideas! For me, the beetle looks more like an African mask. Anyway, your discovery is very interesting - and the jogger was very informative! (When my husband jogs, he jogs and doesn't notice anything of the world ;-))
    In my experience, insects pad their breeding caves with woolly things of all kinds or keep their eggs warm and dry. I saw a piece of sheepskin used by a bumblebee for similar purposes.
    Best wishes from Austria,
    Traude
    https://rostrose.blogspot.com/2021/10/italien-reisebericht-pause-in-ferrara.html

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  22. El árbol no lo conocía, pero las chinches si y no les encuentro ningún parecido con ese monstruo...También siempre me han parecido máscaras o pinturas africanas, mucho más bonitas y creativas...
    Saludos desde Andalucia, España.

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  23. The red stain of blood is an all too apt association with Hitler, one of the most heinous monsters of all time.

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  24. What an interesting day of discovery you had! I'm always amazed with your photography and stories! Thanks for sharing them!

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  25. What a ınteresting post.. thanks for your sharing...

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  26. cool pics and interesting information...just not the picture of you know who!!

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  27. Great find and lovely pictures with interesting captions. Did you squash the Hitler bug 🙄

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  28. What a special tree and bizarre bug!
    You are full of surprises dear Veronica!
    Thank you for this path.
    Happy WW and a fine week!

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  29. Those pods are a bit like on a plant which grows in this area. -smile-

    🍁 🎃 🌰 🎃 🍁

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  30. Hello,

    The stink bug is colorful, interesting tree and Kapok fibers. The tree is pretty. Great series of photos and mosaics! Thank you for linking up and sharing your post. Take care, have a happy day!

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  31. We don't have those bugs in Canada and I haven't seen the tree here neither. Thanks for the information.

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  32. I have to confess that those bugs creep me out! Wouldn't want to encounter them indoors!

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  33. Lo que uno aprende genial entrada. Te mando un beso

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  34. quite interesting that bug looks like Hitler's face... great imagination.

    the tree so tall and huge.... I never seen it.

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  35. How funny Hitler bug can be!

    Have a fine day, Veronica! ♥

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  36. That is so fascinating! A fantastic find, Veronica.

    -Soma

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  37. You have so many interesting posts. Always something new to learn about. I've never heard of a Kapok tree, or seen those kinds of bugs before either. The stink bugs we have over here don't look anything like that.

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  38. I had no idea kapok grew like that! Those bugs look like cartoons, so bright with such clear markings!

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  39. Very strange, I know we have stink bugs here too but I've never seen red ones.

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  40. Me parecen más a pinturas.
    Buen fin de semana.
    Un abrazo.

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  41. It's an interesting post, Veronica.
    The website page about the Hitler bug made me laugh :-)))

    Have a great weekend :-)

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  42. Hola Verónica, no conocía ese árbol, ni nunca había oído hablar de él. Una cosa más que conozco.
    Buen fin de semana.
    Un abrazo

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  43. I've never heard of those bugs before but they are really interesting.

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  44. That is the most unusual looking bug! It looks strange and kind of scary.
    It DOES have a face on it, Yikes! The cotton is soft and pretty, but
    those bugs crawling all over it don't look so nice. : )

    An interesting post, my friend.

    ~Sheri

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  45. Beautiful bugs.
    And I've seen trees like this back home in India and the silky-cotton in those pods. I didn't know they were called Kapok.
    Thank you. :)

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  46. Oh I quickly scrolled through the post with eyes half closed. The bugs give me nightmares.

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  47. Wow... what a totally fun find. The red cotton stainer with the face on it's back is fascinating and creepy all at the same time!

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  48. Wow! brilliant shots can see everydetail and I learn something new everyday :-)

    Have a kapoktastic week Veronica 👍

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  49. I've heard of kapok trees but have never seen one. That is one wild looking bug too.

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  50. How interesting! Kapok tree is new to me. I thought Hitler bug was a toy.

    Yoko

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  51. Cool photos! Fascinating Hitler Bug.

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  52. Fascinating! I used to be scared of almost any bug. Now for the most part I find them utterly fascinating.
    Thanks for sharing at https://image-in-ing.blogspot.com/2021/10/the-old-mill.html

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  53. Pretty bugs! Nice colour. Never seen that kapok around here before. Kapok is Malay for cotton.

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  54. I never knew where kapok came from and always assumed it was a manmade fibre. Those bugs look amazing.

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  55. That is all new to us but the cotton does look real nice and soft and the bugs ugly as they really are can also be seen as pretty.

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  56. Thank you for joining the Wordless Wednesday Blog Hop.

    Have a fabulous Wordless Wednesday. ♥

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  57. Wow that is interesting! It makes me think of the lichen in the trees in the south like in Savannah that they used to use for bedding a couple centuries ago until they realized they were full of chiggers which is a type of mites that bite!
    www.chezmireillefashiontravelmom.com

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  58. What a find, Veronica:) Never have seen cotton in a tree, even less these colorful bugs - how are things in your country? Not in lockdown I hope?

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  59. Oh W O W ! That was something to find. Those bugs are really unique. At first I was thinking a cottonwood tree. SHedding all those cotton puffs! Have a wonderful rest of your week and thank you for sharing.

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